Month: May 2017

Senate Hearing on the Endangered Species Act

May 8, 2017

Despite its success and public support, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee will hold a hearing Wednesday to examine ways to overhaul the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Senator John Barrasso (R-Wyo), chairman of the committee, says his focus is “eliminating a lot of the red tape and the bureaucratic burdens that have been impacting…

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The Words We Use Matter

May 7, 2017

In a recent paper in Biological Conservation, scientists argue that the widespread use of euphemisms by conservation biologists, conservation journals, and conservation biology course materials undermines efforts to evoke caring in others for life on Earth and even to care for ourselves. Euphemisms like “harvest,” “cull,” and “bycatch” are used as a means to mask…

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Mexican Gray Wolf “Trumpet” Turns One!

May 3, 2017

A year ago today, Mexican gray wolf 1143 (“Rosa”) gave birth to a single pup, f1505, a robust little girl nicknamed “Trumpet” for her loud squeals. Today a new chapter begins the critically endangered kiddo, it’s her time to transition from puppy-hood to adulthood. So throw back your head and let out a long celebratory…

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Why do wolves’ eyes glow in the dark?

May 3, 2017

Eyes that glow in the pitch-black night make for many a scary tale. But why do wolves’ eyes glow in the dark? Wolves have a special light-reflecting surface right behind their retinas called the tapetum lucidum that helps animals see better in the dark. When light enters the eye, it’s supposed to hit a photoreceptor…

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The Red Wolf Fab Five Turn Two!

May 1, 2017

Two years ago today on May 2, 2015, five critically endangered red wolves were born – all of them beautiful and each one a valuable contribution to the recovery of his and her rare and at-risk species. Today a new chapter begins for fab five, M2116, M2117, M2118, M2119 and F2121, turn two! Happy birthday,…

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New Threat to Yellowstone Wolves

May 1, 2017

Protected from hunting and trapping, wolves in Yellowstone National Park are better able to express their natural social behavior. This benefits the wider ecosystem, long-running wolf research, ecotourism (wolf watching in Yellowstone alone is estimated to generate $35 million annually for the regional economy), as well as the wolves themselves.When a family group of wolves…

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