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Killing wolves and pups on National Wildlife Refuges? Take action now.

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Comments are due by Sept. 6 on the Interior’s proposed rule that would allow baiting brown bears, killing black bear mothers and cubs in dens, and killing wolves and pups via trapping during the denning season in Alaska’s national preserves.

Alaska’s controversial wildlife management program targets drastic reductions to apex predators like bears and wolves and even operates its intensive management program federal National Wildlife Refuges.

Why? 

The ostensible goal of artificially boosting populations of moose, caribou, and deer for hunters.

Alaska’s intensive management program lacks scientific support.

Beyond being unethical, the utility of these methods to achieve increased prey populations is scientifically questionable. Studies offer no definitive evidence that an intensive predator control program results in increased prey populations.

In a letter dated Aug. 23,  more than 100 scientists and natural resource managers urged the National Park Service to reject the proposed rule.

Far-reaching impacts to public lands and National Wildlife Refuge System.

Intensive predator control program has no place on our National Wildlife Refuges – these are lands set aside for the purpose of conserving wildlife in their natural diversity. Intensive management practices are in direct conflict with the purposes for which the lands were set aside in the first place. To allow these practices to continue calls into question the integrity of our Refuges across the nation.

Take Action Today

Join the thousands of people who are speaking up before the September 6th new extended deadline of November 6.  Please find suggested talking points below and submit your comments here.

  • I am writing to oppose the amendments to regulations for sport hunting and trapping in national preserves in Alaska in docket number RIN 1024-AE38.
  • Excessive and controversial hunting methods like baiting, snaring and aerial gunning are unethical.
  • Moreover, there is no evidence that an intensive predator control program results in increased prey populations – the ostensible goal of the program.
  • More than 100 scientists and natural resource managers from Alaska, other states, Canada and other nations urged the National Park Service in a letter on Aug. 23 to retain the current hunting rules.
  • Alaska’s intensive predator control program has no place on our National Wildlife Refuges – these are lands set aside for the purpose of conserving wildlife in their natural diversity.
  •  Intensive management practices are in direct conflict with the purposes for which the lands were set aside in the first place. To allow these practices to continue calls into question the integrity of our Refuges across the nation.
  • The protections afforded by the regulatory provision issued by the NPS in 2015 are scientifically justifiable. I urge the Interior to reject the proposed rule and to retain the current hunting rules.
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