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Promoting wolf conservation since 1999

Red Wolves

The red wolf (Canis rufus) is one of the world’s most endangered wild canids. Once common throughout the southeastern United States, red wolf populations were decimated by the 1960s due to intensive predator control programs and loss of habitat. A remnant population of red wolves was found along the Gulf coast of Texas and Louisiana. After being declared an endangered species in 1973, efforts were initiated to locate and capture as many wild red wolves as possible. Of the 17 remaining wolves captured by biologists, 14 became the founders of a successful captive breeding program. Consequently, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) declared red wolves extinct in the wild in 1980. Today, a there is a single wild population comprising of only 24 known individuals.

» Read the history of the Red Wolf

» Learn about the ongoing Review and Evaluation of the Red Wolf Recovery Program

» What is the Red Wolf Species Survival Plan (RWSSP)?

» View Red Wolf Species Survival Plan Population Analysis and Breeding and Transfer Recommendations.

» Red Wolf Online Resources and Research.

M2118 (Tyke)

M2118 (Tyke)

Tyke (M2118) was born on May 2, 2015, at the Wolf Conservation Center to parents Moose (M1803) and Salty (F1563). The rambunctious pup quickly distinguished himself from his siblings through his unique sense of humor. With four littermates and three older siblings, someone needed to break the frequent tension! Today Tyke lives off-exhibit with his littermate Moose Jr (MJ or M2119). Webcam watchers often glimpse the playful wolf coaxing his sibling into a quick wrestling match or romp about the enclosure. While Tyke hasn’t yet been slated to breed, he seems quite content in his role as the self-appointed jokester. Every family needs one!

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M2119 (Moose Jr. or MJ)

M2119 (Moose Jr. or MJ)

Moose Jr or MJ (M2119) was born on May 2, 2015, at the Wolf Conservation Center to parents M1803 (Moose) and F1563 (Salty). As is often the case with wolf pup litters, a hierarchy is established at an early age, and this litter was no exception. MJ quickly positioned himself as the dominant one amongst his littermates, and this dominant behavior has only increased as he’s grown. Rather than shy away from unknown sights and sounds, as his siblings do, MJ often approaches unfamiliar things in a curious yet cautious manner. This unique personality trait, coupled with his innate dominance, as firmly cemented his position as one of the leaders in his family group. Today MJ lives off-exhibit with his littermate Tyke (M2118).

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F2121 (Charlotte)

F2121 (Charlotte)

F2121 was born on May 2, 2015, at the Wolf Conservation Center to parents M1803 (Moose) and F1563 (Salty). The only female in a litter of five pups, F2121 (affectionately nicknamed “Charlotte”) distinguished herself from her brothers through her shy nature; visitors rarely saw her during on-site programs, but webcam watchers grew to love her quiet demeanor. Although she no longer resides with her brothers, her quiet nature has matured into a graceful, calm spirit that often serves as a soothing counterbalance to her mate, M1606 (Jack) who is quick to investigate the slightest disturbance. The dynamic duo personifies the adage “opposites attract”; an attraction so strong that it culminated with pups on April 19, 2018 -three males and one female! Congrats Charlotte and Jack!

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M1784 (Sam)

M1784 (Sam)

Family is of the utmost importance to wolves, something red wolf Sam (M1784) certainly feels quite strongly about. The eight-year-old who was transferred in 2017 to the WCC from the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, N.C., where he and his family made national headlines due to some…adventures…this past summer. Sam’s mate, Veronica (F1858), gave birth to a litter of four pups in the spring of 2017 and Sam immediately embraced his new role as a father. Keepers observed him continually bringing food to mate and the pups – he even brought the pups a rat when they were three weeks old! Be still, our beating hearts! However, Sam officially clinched the “Father of the Year” award when he stayed cool under the pressure of having all four of his pups escape their enclosure at the zoo. Rather than panic, as many fathers would do in his situation, Sam regurgitated food and fed it to the pups through the fence! The adventurous family was transferred to the WCC in the fall of 2017 because, due to the genetic value of couple’s offspring, the pair was chosen to breed again in 2018 and required a larger enclosure fit for a growing family. Making the move turned out to be a great idea because, on April 19, 2018, the couple welcomed their second litter - this time four boys and two girls! The family of twelve reside off exhibit but can be viewed via live webcams.

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F1858 (Veronica)

F1858 (Veronica)

The word “superhero” comes to mind when one thinks of Veronica (F1858). Veronica is considered to be one of the most genetically valuable wolves in the red wolf recovery program, so the birth of her four pups in spring 2017 was met with joyous exclamations from all who value red wolf recovery. Veronica, her mate Sam (M1784), and her four pups journeyed to the WCC in the fall of 2017 from their home at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, N.C. , where they made national headlines last summer when the pups escaped from their enclosure at the zoo (and were safely captured, of course)! What a way to welcome F1858 to the lifelong role of being a mother! Renewing the badge of motherhood, Veronica had a second litter (but a litter of New Yorkers this time!) on April 19, 2018; four boys and two girls who so far have proven to be less naughty. Although the family of 12 resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Veronica go about her day; the feisty female is a voracious eater and is quick to offer support and love to her family when needed. A superhero, indeed.

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M1606 (Jack)

M1606 (Jack)

M1606, one of the WCC’s newest red wolves, made quite the entrance when he arrived in December 2017. The spunky red wolf, referred to as “Jack”, flew from his former home at U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Sandy Ridge facility in North Carolina on a private plane! Talk about the celebrity treatment! Thanks to Pilots to the Rescue and their volunteer pilots, Jack was able to bypass long airport lines and enjoy a comfortable flight on his way to his new home. He resides in the WCC’s on-exhibit red wolf enclosure with F2121 (Charlotte) and their four pups born on April 19, 2018! Although he’s shy around people, he can be quite the spitfire when he thinks no one’s watching! Make sure to watch our webcams to catch a glimpse of Jack’s antics!

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m2240 (Max)

m2240 (Max)

In the early evening of April 19, 2018, red wolf F1858 (affectionately named Veronica) gave birth to a litter of six pups; the four boys and two girls were each no larger than a Russet potato. This was the second litter born to Veronica and her mate M1784 (Sam). With parents, pups of the year, and the pair’s four yearlings, the family of twelve inspires a global audience of supporters via WCC's live webcams. They open the door to understanding the highly social nature of wolves, the benefits of cooperative living, the importance of their endangered kin, and the efforts to save them from extinction. Red wolf Max is the largest male of his litter. At nearly two months old, Max weighed 8.6lbs, second only to his sister "big" Martha (f2242) who weighed in at 9.2lbs.

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m2239 (Shane)

m2239 (Shane)

In the early evening of April 19, 2018, red wolf F1858 (affectionately named Veronica) gave birth to a litter of six pups; the four boys and two girls were each no larger than a Russet potato. This was the second litter born to Veronica and her mate M1784 (Sam). With parents, pups of the year, and the pair’s four yearlings, the family of twelve inspires a global audience of supporters via WCC's live webcams. They open the door to understanding the highly social nature of wolves, the benefits of cooperative living, the importance of their endangered kin, and the efforts to save them from extinction. At nearly two months old, Red wolf Shane (m2239) weighed 8.4lbs and was all paws!

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m2241 (Hunter)

m2241 (Hunter)

In the early evening of April 19, 2018, red wolf F1858 (affectionately named Veronica) gave birth to a litter of six pups; the four boys and two girls were each no larger than a Russet potato. This was the second litter born to Veronica and her mate M1784 (Sam). With parents, pups of the year, and the pair’s four yearlings, the family of twelve inspires a global audience of supporters via WCC's live webcams. They open the door to understanding the highly social nature of wolves, the benefits of cooperative living, the importance of their endangered kin, and the efforts to save them from extinction. Weighing 8lbs at nearly two months old, red wolf Hunter (m2241) was the smallest male in the litter, but to his tiny sister Sky Rae (f2243), he's enormous!

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m2238 (Rich)

m2238 (Rich)

In the early evening of April 19, 2018, red wolf F1858 (affectionately named Veronica) gave birth to a litter of six pups; the four boys and two girls were each no larger than a Russet potato. This was the second litter born to Veronica and her mate M1784 (Sam). With parents, pups of the year, and the pair’s four yearlings, the family of twelve inspires a global audience of supporters via WCC's live webcams. They open the door to understanding the highly social nature of wolves, the benefits of cooperative living, the importance of their endangered kin, and the efforts to save them from extinction. At nearly two months old, red wolf Rich (m2238) weighed 8.2 lbs, one pound lighter than his sister Martha (f2242), but in his eyes, you can see the strength of his soul.

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f2242 (Martha)

f2242 (Martha)

In the early evening of April 19, 2018, red wolf F1858 (affectionately named Veronica) gave birth to a litter of six pups; the four boys and two girls were each no larger than a Russet potato. This was the second litter born to Veronica and her mate M1784 (Sam). With parents, pups of the year, and the pair’s four yearlings, the family of twelve inspires a global audience of supporters via WCC's live webcams. They open the door to understanding the highly social nature of wolves, the benefits of cooperative living, the importance of their endangered kin, and the efforts to save them from extinction. At nearly two months old, red wolf Martha (f2242) was the biggest of her littermates weighing in at 9.2 lbs! Beyond her size, Martha stands out from the rest with her distinctive white-tipped tail!

f2243 (SkyRae)

f2243 (SkyRae)

In the early evening of April 19, 2018, red wolf F1858 (affectionately named Veronica) gave birth to a litter of six pups; the four boys and two girls were each no larger than a Russet potato. This was the second litter born to Veronica and her mate M1784 (Sam). With parents, pups of the year, and the pair’s four yearlings, the family of twelve inspires a global audience of supporters via WCC's live webcams. They open the door to understanding the highly social nature of wolves, the benefits of cooperative living, the importance of their endangered kin, and the efforts to save them from extinction. At nearly two months old, red wolf SkyRae (f2243) was the tiniest of her littermates weighing in at 7.6 lbs; she's also lighter in color. Her most memorable feature, however, is her heartwarming smile.

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m2234 (Maple)

m2234 (Maple)

In the early evening of April 19, 2018, red wolf F2121 (Charlotte) gave birth to a litter of four pups -three males and one female. This was the first litter born to Charlotte and her mate M1606 (Jack). With high pitch peeps and squeals, the adorable newborns announced their debut to a global community of onlookers via the WCC’s network of live webcams. Red wolf pup m2234 and his siblings first started to squeak out un-solicited howls at just a couple of weeks old. But once their ears open and hearing improves at around one month, wolf pups learn about howling as both a communication tool as well as a method of family bonding. At nearly 2 months old, m2234 can hear great - he's all ears!

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m2235 (Ben)

m2235 (Ben)

In the early evening of April 19, 2018, red wolf F2121 (Charlotte) gave birth to a litter of four pups -three males and one female. This was the first litter born to Charlotte and her mate M1606 (Jack). With high pitch peeps and squeals, the adorable newborns announced their debut to a global community of onlookers via the WCC’s network of live webcams. Red wolf pup m2235 and his siblings first started to squeak out un-solicited howls at just a couple of weeks old. By the time they were around five weeks old, the tiny singers never failed to join their parents for a family howl; m2235 and his littermates often howl on the highest point of their vast enclosure, a rounded hill called "Red Rise."

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m2236 (Deven)

m2236 (Deven)

In the early evening of April 19, 2018, red wolf F2121 (Charlotte) gave birth to a litter of four pups -three males and one female. This was the first litter born to Charlotte and her mate M1606 (Jack). With high pitch peeps and squeals, the adorable newborns announced their debut to a global community of onlookers via the WCC’s network of live webcams. Look at those ears, red wolf pup m2236! Sure, his big ears help you hear better, and they’re super cute, but as red wolves who are well adapted to the hot, humid climate of the southeastern United States know, big ears are also a great way of dissipating excess body heat.

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f2237 (Marley)

f2237 (Marley)

In the early evening of April 19, 2018, red wolf F2121 (Charlotte) gave birth to a litter of four pups -three males and one female. This was the first litter born to Charlotte and her mate M1606 (Jack). With high pitch peeps and squeals, the adorable newborns announced their debut to a global community of onlookers via the WCC’s network of live webcams. Red wolf pup f2237 follows her mom Charlotte pretty closely. Beyond being a great parent, wolf pups are homeschooled, so the parents need to be good educators as well. The parents demonstrate critical hunting skills, parenting strategies and other techniques for the pups to employ when they reach adulthood. Passing down knowledge from one generation to the next allows the family to maintain traditions unique to that pack.

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M2206 (Notch)

M2206 (Notch)

On April 28, 2017, red wolf F1858 (Veronica) gave birth to a litter of four pups - two males and two females. These were the first pups born to Veronica and her mate M1784 (Sam), and the naughtiest litter to boot! Residing at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, N.C., the new family made national headlines when the pups escaped from their enclosure at the zoo! Among the little escape artists was red wolf M2206, affectionately called "Notch" for the notch in his ear. New chapters opened for Notch and his rambunctious littermates in the months that followed their escape in N.C.; in the fall of 2017, the family of six moved to the Wolf Conservation Center, the following April, their mother Veronica gave them six newborn siblings - four males and two females! Although the family of 12 resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Notch employ parenting strategies in his new role as babysitter. Raising pups is a family affair and Notch has taken a leadership position among his siblings. This is key, as passing down knowledge from one generation to the next allows the family to maintain traditions unique to that pack.

M2208

M2208

On April 28, 2017, red wolf F1858 (Veronica) gave birth to a litter of four pups - two males and two females. These were the first pups born to Veronica and her mate M1784 (Sam), and the naughtiest litter to boot! Residing at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, N.C., the new family made national headlines when the pups escaped from their enclosure at the zoo! Among the little escape artists was female red wolf M2208. New chapters opened for M2208 and his rambunctious littermates in the months that followed their escape in N.C.; in the fall of 2017, the family of six moved to the Wolf Conservation Center, the following April, their mother Veronica gave them six newborn siblings - four males and two females! Although the family of twelve resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam viewers love watching M2208 and his three littermates chase and test their younger siblings. Here's hoping they don't teach the youngsters any of their tricks!

F2210

F2210

On April 28, 2017, red wolf F1858 (Veronica) gave birth to a litter of four pups - two males and two females. These were the first pups born to Veronica and her mate M1784 (Sam), and the naughtiest litter to boot! Residing at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, N.C., the new family made national headlines when the pups escaped from their enclosure at the zoo! Among the little escape artists was red wolf F2210, the mischievous female who might have been the leader of their caper - she's the feistiest goofball of the bunch! New chapters opened for F2210 and her rambunctious littermates in the months that followed their escape in N.C.; in the fall of 2017, the family of six moved to the Wolf Conservation Center, the following April, their mother Veronica gave them six newborn siblings - four males and two females! Although the family of twelve resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam viewers love watching F2210 and her three littermates scramble to corral their younger siblings. Here's hoping they don't teach the youngsters any of their tricks!

F2211

F2211

On April 28, 2017, red wolf F1858 (Veronica) gave birth to a litter of four pups - two males and two females. These were the first pups born to Veronica and her mate M1784 (Sam), and the naughtiest litter to boot! Residing at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, N.C., the new family made national headlines when the pups escaped from their enclosure at the zoo! Among the little escape artists was female red wolf F2211. New chapters opened for F2211 and her rambunctious littermates in the months that followed their escape in N.C.; in the fall of 2017, the family of six moved to the Wolf Conservation Center, the following April, their mother Veronica gave them six newborn siblings - four males and two females! Although the family of twelve resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam viewers love watching F2211 and her three littermates chase and test their younger siblings. Here's hoping they don't teach the youngsters any of their tricks!

F2204 (Everest)

F2204 (Everest)

F2204, affectionately named Everest, was born on April 21, 2017 at the Tallahassee Museum in Florida. The dark beauty joined the Wolf Conservation Center family on December 14, 2018 to reside with red wolf brothers M2119 (Moose Jr or "MJ") and M2118 (Tyke).

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