pant_tongue_logo_sm.png_blog

With temperatures reaching over 90°F, the wolves have been all tongues this week…

Wolves (like dogs) will stay cool by panting to evaporate heat and moisture off their tongue. Panting is especially effective for wolves. A wolf’s elongated muzzle and the shape of the inner nose serve as an efficient cooling system. Wolves also alter their patterns of activity, staying hunkered down during the hottest times of the day.

Stay cool, everyone!

Posted in Wolf Facts | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Melissa_dinino_blog

Curious about life in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem? Join the Wolf Conservation Center and biologist Melissa DiNino for a discussion on large carnivore coexistence!

DiNino will offer insight into challenges facing wolf, grizzly bear, and large carnivore recovery across the American West, while detailing her experience as a range rider and biologist among Montana’s most wild places.

Date: August 30th at 6:30 pm

Fee: $20 per person

Register now!

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Melissa DiNino is a biologist working on livestock-predator conflict projects throughout the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. She is best known for her work as a range rider in Montana’s Centennial Valley and Tom Miner Basin, from where she continues to live and work. She has also tracked the Lamar Canyon Pack with the Yellowstone Wolf Project to study predation rate in the park. Born and raised in Connecticut, she found her first opportunity to work with wolves through the Wolf Conservation Center before taking her passion out west. 

 

Photo by Louise Johns.

Posted in Events, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Eyes that glow in the pitch-black night make for many a scary tale. But why do wolves’ eyes glow in the dark?

Wolves have a special light-reflecting surface right behind their retinas called the tapetum lucidum that helps animals see better in the dark. When light enters the eye, it’s supposed to hit a photoreceptor that transmits the information to the brain. But sometimes the light doesn’t hit the photoreceptor, so the tapetum lucidum acts as a mirror to bounce it back for a second chance.

 

Posted in Video | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment