logo


Promoting wolf conservation since 1999

header mexican wolves

Mexican Gray Wolves

The Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) or “lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of gray wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America. By the mid-1980s, hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of lobos in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. In 1998 the wolves were reintroduced into the wild as part of a federal reintroduction program under the Endangered Species Act. Today in the U.S., there is a single wild population comprising only 114 individuals - a slight increase from the 113 counted at the end of 2016.

In 2003 the WCC was accepted into the Species Survival Plan (SSP) for the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf and has played a critical role in preserving and protecting these imperiled species through carefully managed breeding and reintroduction. The goal of the Recovery Plan is to restore Mexican gray wolves to a portion of their ancestral range in the southwest United States and Mexico. To date, the WCC remains one of the three largest holding facilities for these rare species and three lobos from the WCC have been given the extraordinary opportunity to resume their rightful place on the wild landscape. The 26 Mexican gray wolves currently reside at the WCC and occupy four enclosures in the Center's Endangered Species Facility. These enclosures are private and secluded, and the wolves are not on exhibit for the public. Wolves in the wild are naturally afraid of people so the WCC staff follows a protocol to have minimal human contact with the Mexican wolves. This will ensure they have a greater probability of being successful if they are released into the wild as part of the recovery plan.

» Read the history of the Mexican Gray Wolf

» What is the Mexican Wolf Species Survival Plan?

» Read U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s Mexican Wolf Recovery Reports

» Mexican Wolf Online Resources and Research.

F1143 (Rosa)

F1143 (Rosa)

Mexican gray wolf F1143, affectionately known as “Rosa,” was born at the WCC in 2008 to Mexican gray wolf F613 (Mama Gray) – she and her siblings were the first Mexican wolves born at the WCC! Over the years, Rosa has said farewell to most of her family members, but she’s had the opportunity to build a new family of her own. In 2015, F1143 was introduced to Mexican gray wolf M1059 (Diego), and the pair quickly bonded, spending many days cuddling on top of their den and sharing meals. Their bond was quite evident when, in the spring of 2016, Rosa gave birth to a daughter, f1505 (nicknamed “Trumpet” for the loud squeals she made as a newborn). The family of two became a close-knit family of three and WCC staff and supporters rejoiced at the apparent happiness and love felt by the trio. Unfortunately, their days as a family unit were numbered. As part of the Mexican wolf Species Survival Plan (SSP), certain Mexican wolves are paired for breeding each year based on the genetics of both the wild and captive populations. Rosa was found to be a perfect genetic match for Mexican wolf M1198 (Alléno), another WCC male, so she bid farewell to Diego and Trumpet in the fall of 2017 and slowly began to form a bond with Alléno. Jump to May 8, 2018; Rosa reveals that love can strike a second time with the birth of nine pups - six males and three females! Although the family of eleven resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Rosa and Alléno chase their baseball team of pups!

M1133 (Rhett)

M1133 (Rhett)

One of our most popular Mexican gray wolves, “Rhett” was born at the California Wolf Center in 2008 and has lived an adventurous life. USFWS released him into the wild in 2013 with the hope that he would become the alpha male of Arizona’s Bluestem pack after the previous alpha male was killed. Unfortunately, Rhett failed to capture the attention of the pack’s alpha female so three weeks after his release he was placed back in captivity. While at USFWS’s captive breeding center he was paired with a wild-born female and this pair was released in the spring. However, Rhett and his mate traveled in the wrong direction and ultimately ended up near human settlements in an area with very little natural prey. Similar to his previous release and capture, Rhett was once again placed in captivity and he has lived at the WCC ever since. Rhett’s new mate (F810 or Scarlett) passed away in March 2015. In the fall of the following year, he was introduced to Mexican wolf F1226 (Belle) and their union proved fruitful: Belle gave birth to pups m1506, m 1507, and f1508 in the spring of 2016! The pair bond between Rhett and Belle proved to be quite strong, as Belle gave birth to yet another litter of pups in 2017. The family welcomed pups f1619, f1620, and f1621, growing their family of five to a robust family of eight! Although the family resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love observing the dynamic relationships bewteen the members of the multigeneration pack.

M1198 (Alléno)

M1198 (Alléno)

Mexican gray wolf M1198 (a.k.a. Alléno) was born at the Endangered Wolf Center on May 2, 2010. The handsome fellow was transferred to the Rio Grande Zoo in 2012 and joined the Wolf Conservation Center family in October of 2014 to accompany Mexican wolf F749 (a.k.a. Bella). Sadly, just over a year after their introduction, his female companion passed away. She was 13 years old. Alléno briefly lived with a companion, F1435 (Magdalena), but was introduced to Mexican gray wolf F1143 (Rosa) in the fall of 2017 in the hopes that the pair would contribute to the genetic growth of their critically endangered species with pups. Jump to May 8, 2018; Alléno and Rosa welcome nine pups - six males and three females! Whoa! Although the family of eleven resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Rosa and Alléno chase their baseball team of pups.

F1226 (Belle)

F1226 (Belle)

F1226 (Belle) was born at the California Wolf Center on April 30, 2011. In August of 2013, the loba was transferred to U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s Sivilleta Management Facility in New Mexico where she was paired with M1336 following year in hopes the wolves would whelp pups in captivity and then be released in the wild shortly thereafter. The pair failed to prove fruitful. On October 14, 2015, Belle joined M1133 (Rhett) at the Wolf Conservation Center and luckily, the pair got along quite well! Belle gave birth to a litter of three pups (m1506, m1507, and f1508) in the spring of 2016 and ANOTHER litter of pups (f1619, f1620, and f1621) in 2017! Fun Fact – This beautiful loba is permanently plump (or big boned…) – she's just built that way!

M1059 (Diego)

M1059 (Diego)

Mexican gray wolf M1059 – “Diego” was born at the California Wolf Center on April 22 (Earth Day!) of 2007. He and his two brothers, M1058 (Chico) and M1060 (Durango), were transferred to the Seneca Zoo in 2011. The trio joined the Wolf Conservation Center family in November of 2015, but WCC was merely a pit-stop for M1058 and M1060. Just weeks after their arrival, they returned west to reside at the Living Desert Zoo and Gardens in Palm Springs, CA. Although Diego no longer lives with his brothers, the handsome dark lobo remains among family as his younger brother, M1133 (Rhett), also calls the WCC home. Diego was introduced to F1143 (Rosa), and the pair welcomed a pup, f1505 (Trumpet) in the spring of 2016. In the interest of expanding the genetic diversity of the Mexican wolf population, Diego and Rosa were separated for the 2018 breeding season, after which Rosa produced nine pups with Mexican gray wolf M1198 (Alléno). Love stuck a second time for Diego as well, today he lives with his new lady companion, F1435 (Magdalena).

F1505 (Trumpet)

F1505 (Trumpet)

On the morning of May 4th, Mexican gray wolf F1143 (Rosa) gave birth to a single pup (f1505) – a robust little girl nicknamed “Trumpet” for her loud squeals. Unbeknownst to the kiddo, Trumpet had been warming the hearts of a global audience via the WCC's remote webcams. Her fans were elated to learn that she would be introduced to a new lobo in town during fall of 2017 -Mexican gray wolf M1564 (LightHawk). On April 30, Trumpet welcomed three pups of her own. Following in their mother’s footsteps, the noisy newborns entered the world amongst a chorus of sounds. Trumpet’s solo act grew into an orchestra of growls, yips, and peeps! The squeaky noises are not only adorable but are so rarely heard on the wild landscape.

M1506 (Duffy)

M1506 (Duffy)

Just before midnight on May 25th, Mexican gray wolf F1126 (a.k.a. Belle) gave birth to three beautiful pups - two boys and a girl. m1506 (a.k.a. Duffy) was the smallest in the litter, and for his first 6 weeks had a single adorable lopped ear. In addition to being cute, he and his critically endangered littermates are valuable contributions to the recovery of their rare and at-risk species.

M1507 (Maus)

M1507 (Maus)

Just before midnight on May 25th, Mexican gray wolf F1126 (a.k.a. Belle) gave birth to three beautiful pups - two boys and a girl. m1507, a.k.a. Maus, looks a lot like his father - they share the same nose! In addition to being adorable, the critically endangered kiddos are valuable contributions to the recovery of their rare and at-risk species.

F1508 (K.B.)

F1508 (K.B.)

Just before midnight on May 25th, Mexican gray wolf F1126 (a.k.a. Belle) gave birth to three beautiful pups - two boys and a girl called f1508 (aka K.B.). The darkest in color compared to her brothers, K.B looks a bit like her father. In addition to being adorable, the critically endangered kiddos are valuable contributions to the recovery of their rare and at-risk species.

F1435 (Magdalena)

F1435 (Magdalena)

F1435 (Magdalena) arrived at the Wolf Conservation Center from the Brookfield Zoo in Brookfield, IL in November of 2016. She lives on exhibit with Mexican gray wolf M1059 (“Diego”). The dark beauty was born on May 29, 2015 and is the older sister to two wolves who received the “call of the wild” in April of 2016. As pups, her younger siblings were placed in the den of the Arizona-based Elk Horn Pack of wild wolves with the intention that the pack’s adults would raise the two with its own litter. In this process, known as “cross-fostering,” very young pups are moved from a litter at a zoo or wildlife center to a wild litter of similar age so that the receiving pack raises the pups as its own. The technique, which has proven successful with wolves and other wildlife, shows promise to improve the genetic diversity of the wild wolf population.

M1564 (LightHawk)

M1564 (LightHawk)

At first glance, M1564 (LightHawk) seems like every other Mexican wolf residing in the Wolf Conservation Center’s Endangered Species facility: elusive, endangered, essential. But the shy male has experienced something only very few lobos have – the wild. Born around April 15th, 2015, LightHawk spent most of his young life roaming the vast terrain of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests as a member of the Hawks Nest Pack but his life as a wild lobo came to a devastating end when he was removed from the wild in the fall of 2016 for attacking livestock. The elusive male was then flown to the WCC in 2017 via a series of private flights (thanks to the organization Lighthawk) and introduced to a spacious enclosure, where he now resides with f1505. The feisty female, affectionately known as “Trumpet”, captured the hearts of WCC staff and supporters when she was born to parents M1059 (Diego) and F1143 (Rosa) in 2016. Webcam viewers were entertained by her boundless energy and endless antics, and were overjoyed upon learning about her union with LightHawk. The pair has enjoyed months of “newlywed bliss,” but their honeymoon stage came to a close on April 30, 2018, with the arrival of three pups - two males and one female!

f1620 (Max)

f1620 (Max)

On May 22, Mexican gray wolf F1226 (affectionately nicknamed Belle by supporters) gave birth to a litter of three pups - all females! This is the second litter born to mom (age six), and dad (M1133 or Rhett), (age nine). With parents, newborns, and the pair’s three yearlings born in 2016, the public has an opportunity to study the complex social structure of a multigenerational pack. Unbeknown to the wolves, WCC webcams allow a global audience to observe their behavior 24/7. Mexican gray wolf f1620 (Max) is the boldest of her littermates. She's always first to investigate anything new, especially if it something edible!

f1619 (Jean)

f1619 (Jean)

On May 22, Mexican gray wolf F1226 (affectionately nicknamed Belle by supporters) gave birth to a litter of three pups - all females! This is the second litter born to mom (age six), and dad (M1133 or Rhett), (age nine). With parents, newborns, and the pair’s three yearlings born in 2016, the public has an opportunity to study the complex social structure of a multigenerational pack. Unbeknown to the wolves, WCC webcams allow a global audience to observe their behavior 24/7. Shy and always with a family member, f1619, a.k.a. Jean, is the quietest of her litter, but that doesn’t make her any less fierce!

f1621 (Nita)

f1621 (Nita)

On May 22, Mexican gray wolf F1226 (affectionately nicknamed Belle by supporters) gave birth to a litter of three pups - all females! This is the second litter born to mom (age six), and dad (M1133 or Rhett), (age nine). With parents, newborns, and the pair’s three yearlings born in 2016, the public has an opportunity to study the complex social structure of a multigenerational pack. Unbeknown to the wolves, WCC webcams allow a global audience to observe their behavior 24/7. Mexican gray wolf f1621, named Nita in honor of a dedicated champion for the loba’s wild kin, has been a spitfire from the start! Although her eyes had yet to open, during her first health exam at one week old, Nita wouldn't stop growling.

m1742 (Kral)

m1742 (Kral)

On April 30, 2018, first-time parent F1505 (affectionately nicknamed, “Trumpet” for her loud squeals upon her birth in 2016) welcomed three pups - two males and one female. Following in their mother’s footsteps, the noisy newborns entered the world amongst a chorus of sounds. Trumpet’s solo act has grown into an orchestra of growls, yips, and peeps! The squeaky sounds are not only adorable, but are so rarely heard on the wild landscape. m1742 and his siblings have embraced their role as the kiddos of the family; they've been observed causing havoc and running their parents ragged, but they're also fond of snuggling in leaf piles for afternoon naps.

m1743 (Joe Darling)

m1743 (Joe Darling)

On April 30, 2018, first-time parent F1505 (affectionately nicknamed, “Trumpet” for her loud squeals upon her birth in 2016) welcomed three pups - two males and one female. Following in their mother’s footsteps, the noisy newborns entered the world amongst a chorus of sounds. Trumpet’s solo act has grown into an orchestra of growls, yips, and peeps! The squeaky sounds are not only adorable, but are so rarely heard on the wild landscape. m1743 and his siblings have embraced their role as the kiddos of the family; they've been observed causing havoc and running their parents ragged, but they're also fond of snuggling in leaf piles for afternoon naps.

f1744 (Babs)

f1744 (Babs)

On April 30, 2018, first-time parent F1505 (affectionately nicknamed, “Trumpet” for her loud squeals upon her birth in 2016) welcomed three pups - two males and one female. Following in their mother’s footsteps, the noisy newborns entered the world amongst a chorus of sounds. Trumpet’s solo act has grown into an orchestra of growls, yips, and peeps! The squeaky sounds are not only adorable, but are so rarely heard on the wild landscape. f1744 is the lone girl among two rambunctious boys but she's more than willing to take part in their antics, and can often be seen playing and wrestling with her brothers.

m1746 (Craighead)

m1746 (Craighead)

On May 8, 2018, Mexican gray wolf F1143 (Rosa) gave birth to a baseball team of pups Rosa - six males and three females! Although the family of eleven resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Rosa and Alléno chase their baseball team of pups! A global audience has been falling in love with the teeny tiny twosome - the male runt (m1746) and female runt (f1752 ). They might be small in size, but the spirited pair have big personalities! The little lobos are half the size of most of their seven other siblings but are otherwise healthy and thriving.

m1747 (Mittermeier)

m1747 (Mittermeier)

On May 8, 2018, Mexican gray wolf F1143 (Rosa) gave birth to a baseball team of pups Rosa - six males and three females! Although the family of eleven resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Rosa and Alléno chase their baseball team of pups! A global audience has been falling in love with the little lobos. They've witnessed their first steps, their first howls, and much more!

m1748 (Lek)

m1748 (Lek)

On May 8, 2018, Mexican gray wolf F1143 (Rosa) gave birth to a baseball team of pups Rosa - six males and three females! Although the family of eleven resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Rosa and Alléno chase their baseball team of pups! A global audience has been falling in love with the little lobos. They've witnessed their first steps, their first howls, and much more!

m1749 (Carson)

m1749 (Carson)

On May 8, 2018, Mexican gray wolf F1143 (Rosa) gave birth to a baseball team of pups Rosa - six males and three females! Although the family of eleven resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Rosa and Alléno chase their baseball team of pups! A global audience has been falling in love with the little lobos. They've witnessed their first steps, their first howls, and much more!

m1750 (Goodall)

m1750 (Goodall)

On May 8, 2018, Mexican gray wolf F1143 (Rosa) gave birth to a baseball team of pups Rosa - six males and three females! Although the family of eleven resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Rosa and Alléno chase their baseball team of pups! A global audience has been falling in love with the little lobos. They've witnessed their first steps, their first howls, and much more!

m1751 (Beattie)

m1751 (Beattie)

On May 8, 2018, Mexican gray wolf F1143 (Rosa) gave birth to a baseball team of pups Rosa - six males and three females! Although the family of eleven resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Rosa and Alléno chase their baseball team of pups! A global audience has been falling in love with the little lobos. They've witnessed their first steps, their first howls, and much more!

f1752 (Diane)

f1752 (Diane)

On May 8, 2018, Mexican gray wolf F1143 (Rosa) gave birth to a baseball team of pups Rosa - six males and three females! Although the family of eleven resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Rosa and Alléno chase their baseball team of pups! A global audience has been falling in love with the teeny tiny twosome - the male runt (m1746) and female runt (f1752 ). They might be small in size, but the spirited pair have big personalities! The little lobos are half the size of most of their seven other siblings but are otherwise healthy and thriving.

f1753 (Hélène)

f1753 (Hélène)

On May 8, 2018, Mexican gray wolf F1143 (Rosa) gave birth to a baseball team of pups Rosa - six males and three females! Although the family of eleven resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Rosa and Alléno chase their baseball team of pups! A global audience has been falling in love with the little lobos. They've witnessed their first steps, their first howls, and much more!

f1754 (Bria)

f1754 (Bria)

On May 8, 2018, Mexican gray wolf F1143 (Rosa) gave birth to a baseball team of pups Rosa - six males and three females! Although the family of eleven resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Rosa and Alléno chase their baseball team of pups! A global audience has been falling in love with the little lobos. They've witnessed their first steps, their first howls, and much more!

 

 

Click here to adopt a Mexican Gray Wolf





Print Email