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Promoting wolf conservation since 1999

Wolf Conservation Center Webcams

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The Wolf Conservation Center's (WCC) educational impact is a whole lot broader! Our collection of webcams allow an unlimited number of viewers to enter the private lives of our "Ambassador" wolves Atka, Alawa, Zephyr and Nikai, and three elusive packs of critically endangered wolves via unobtrusive cameras in and around anticipated den sites.

As participant in the Species Survival Plans (SSPs) and Recovery Plans for two critically endangered wolf species, the WCC acts as caretaker for 7 red wolves (Canis rufus), and 26 Mexican gray wolves (Canis lupus baileyi). The Mexican gray wolf and the red wolf are among the most rare mammals in North America. Presently there are approximately 400 Mexican gray wolves and fewer than 300 red wolves remaining in the world.

Below are brief introductions to the wolves with links to the live webcams. Enjoy and please let us know if you see anything interesting!

ATKA

  • About Atka
    Atka is the oldest ambassador wolf at the Wolf Conservation Center (WCC). He arrived at the WCC from Minnesota when he was just 8 days old. He was raised by the WCC staff, volunteers, ambassador wolves and Eno. Eno was the WCC’s resident German Shepherd and ambassador wolf nanny. On July 5th, 2005 we were forced to say goodbye to our friend Eno, he passed away at the age of 12. Atka lived with Apache, Kaila and Lukas as a member of the ambassador family until the age of three. At this age, Atka began to challenge Apache for his leadership (alpha) position in the pack. This is natural behavior as most wild wolves disperse from their natal packs between the age or 2 and 3 years old to establish their own families. In December of 2005, we helped Atka disperse to his new home, a brand new enclosure adjacent to his old family. Read more
  • Adopt Atka

    How can I adopt Atka?

    Anyone can adopt one (or all) of our wolves via a direct donation to the Wolf Conservation Center. We offer four levels of donations which come with various perks. Check them out and adopt your favorite WCC wolf or wolves today!

    Adopt Atka


Go to webcam


ALAWA, ZEPHYR AND NIKAI

  • About Zephyr
    Zephyr (meaning "light or west wind") is a beautiful black male with a prominent nose and a feisty personality. He and his litter-mate, Alawa (meaning "sweetpea" in Algonquin, and pronounced "ai-lay-ewa"), were born on April 20 and arrived at the WCC on May 27. They join Atka to make up the Ambassador Pack - the wolves on view as part of the WCC's education programs. Read more
  • About Alawa
    Alawa (meaning "sweetpea" in Algonquin, and pronounced "ai-lay-ewa) is brown and gray and her temperament matches her name. She and her litter-mate, Zephyr (meaning "light or west wind"), were born on April 20 and arrived at the WCC on May 27. They join Atka to make up the Ambassador Pack - the wolves on view as part of the WCC's education programs. Read more
  • About Nikai
    Nikai (meaning “Little Saint” or One Who Wanders”) is a tan and gray wolf who joined the Wolf Conservation Center family in May of 2014. He currently resides with his brother Zephyr, and sister, Alawa. Together with Atka, they make up the Ambassador Pack - the wolves on view as part of the WCC's education programs. Read more
  • Adopt the Wolves

    How can I adopt these wolves?

    Anyone can adopt one (or all) of our wolves via a direct donation to the Wolf Conservation Center. We offer four levels of donations which come with various perks. Check them out and adopt your favorite WCC wolf or wolves today!

    Adopt a WCC Ambassador Wolf


Go to webcam


RED WOLVES

  • About Red Wolves
    In 2004 the WCC was accepted into the Species Survival Plan for the critically endangered red wolf (canis rufus). There are fewer than 300 red wolves in the world making it one of the rarest mammals in North America. The WCC is home to 10 red wolves. The US Fish and Wildlife Service is restoring red wolves to a portion of their traditional range in the southeast United States. Prior to reintroduction the red wolf was extinct in the wild. One of our resident red wolf families occupy an off-exhibit enclosure in the WCC's Endangered Species Facility. These enclosures are private and secluded, and the wolves are not on exhibit for the public. The WCC’s second red pack is on exhibit in the Red Wolf Exhibit which opened in October of 2009. For the first time ever visitors to the WCC are given the opportunity to see this rare an elusive species.

    Adopt a red wolf

  • Adopt the Wolves

    How can I adopt these wolves?

    Anyone can adopt one (or all) of our wolves via a direct donation to the Wolf Conservation Center. We offer four levels of donations which come with various perks. Check them out and adopt your favorite WCC wolf or wolves today!

    Adopt a red wolf


Go to webcam


MEXICAN GRAY WOLVES M1564 (LIGHTHAWK AND F1505 (TRUMPET)

  • About Lighthawk and Trumpet
    Mexican gray wolves M1564 (Lighthawk) and f1505 (Trumpet) were introduced to each other on a crisp winter day in December 2017. The critically endangered lobos, each born in 2016, share many similar traits except for one glaring difference: M1564 was born in the wilds of Arizona, while f1505 was born in a secluded, spacious enclosure at the WCC. M1564 spent most of his young life roaming the vast terrain of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests as a member of the Hawks Nest Pack but his life as a wild lobo came to a devastating end when he was removed from the wild in the fall of 2017 for attacking livestock. The elusive male was then flown to the WCC via a series of private flights (thanks to the organization Lighthawk) and introduced to a spacious enclosure, where he now resides with f1505. Although M1564 garnered attention for his wild adventures, f1505 is certainly well-known amongst her followers. The young female, born to parents M1059 and F1143 in May 2016, quickly earned herself the nickname “Trumpet”, due to the loud squeaks she made as a pup. Her feisty personality continues to earn her many admirers and it appears as though her “wild” nature is more than a match for M1564. The pair will hopefully produce offspring in the coming months and further contribute to the success and survival of their critically endangered species.

Go to webcam


RED WOLVES M1784, F1858, & 4 PUPS OF THE YEAR

  • Red wolf F1568
    F1858 (VERONICA) The word “superhero” comes to mind when one thinks of Veronica (F1858). Veronica is considered to be one of the most genetically valuable wolves in the red wolf recovery program, so the birth of her four pups in spring 2017 was met with joyous exclamations from all who value red wolf recovery. Veronica, her mate Sam (M1784), and her four pups journeyed to the WCC in the fall of 2017 from their home at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, N.C. , where they made national headlines last summer when the pups escaped from their enclosure at the zoo (and were safely captured, of course)! What a way to welcome F1858 to the lifelong role of being a mother! Renewing the badge of motherhood, Veronica had a second litter (but a litter of New Yorkers this time!) on April 19, 2018; four boys and two girls who so far have proven to be less naughty. Although the family of 12 resides off-exhibit at the WCC, webcam watchers love watching Veronica go about her day; the feisty female is a voracious eater and is quick to offer support and love to her family when needed. A superhero, indeed
  • Adopt the Wolves

    How can I adopt these wolves?

    Anyone can adopt one (or all) of our wolves via a direct donation to the Wolf Conservation Center. We offer four levels of donations which come with various perks. Check them out and adopt your favorite WCC wolf or wolves today!

    Adopt a Red Wolf


Go to webcam


MEXICAN GRAY WOLVES F1226 AND M1133

  • About Mexican Gray Wolves
    In 2003 the WCC was accepted into the Species Survival Plan (SSP) and US Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Plan for the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf. There are approximately 400 Mexican gray wolves in the world making it one of the rarest mammals in North America. As of the beginning of 2015, 109 of these wolves live in the wild. The WCC is home to 14 Mexican gray wolves. The goal of the Recovery Plan is to restore Mexican gray wolves to a portion of their traditional range in the southwest United States. The 7 Mexican gray wolves at the WCC occupy five enclosures in the WCC Endangered Species Facility. These enclosures are private and secluded, and the wolves are not on exhibit for the public. Wolves in the wild are naturally afraid of people so the WCC staff follows a protocol to have minimal human contact with the Mexican wolves. This will ensure they have a greater probability of being successful if they are released into the wild as part of the recovery plan. Read more
  • Adopt the Wolves

    How can I adopt these wolves?

    Anyone can adopt one (or all) of our wolves via a direct donation to the Wolf Conservation Center. We offer four levels of donations which come with various perks. Check them out and adopt your favorite WCC wolf or wolves today!

    Adopt a Mexican Gray Wolf


Go to webcam


RED WOLVES M2118 (TYKE) AND M2119 (MJ)

  • Red Wolves Everest (F2204), M2118 (Tyke) and M2119 (MJ)
    Critically endangered red wolf brother M2118 (Tyke) and M2119 (Moose Jr. or MJ) were born to parents M1803 (Moose) and F1563 (Salty) on May 2, 2015 at the Wolf Conservation Center. Just like human siblings, these brothers have differing and unique personalities. MJ takes on more of a dominant role, tending to be bold and innately curious; cautiously investigating anything unfamiliar. On the other hand, MJ’s brother Tyke is a fun-loving jokester, often luring his brother in playful romps. F2204 (Everest) joined the WCC family on 12/13/2018 to be eventually introduced to Tyke and MJ. While the WCC has been a vocal and visible advocate in trying to protect and preserve critically endangered red wolves, the center is also active in physically safeguarding representatives of the extremely rare species that have been entrusted to its care. With less than 30 red wolves in the wild, the WCC is one of 43 facilities in the U.S. participating in the Red Wolf Species Survival Plan (SSP) – a breeding and management program whose primary purpose is to support the reestablishment of red wolves in the wild through captive breeding, public education, and research.
  • Adopt the Wolves

    How can I adopt these wolves?

    Anyone can adopt one (or all) of our wolves via a direct donation to the Wolf Conservation Center. We offer four levels of donations which come with various perks. Check them out and adopt your favorite WCC wolf or wolves today!

    Adopt a Red Wolf

Go to webcam


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